Unconscious Bias Hiring – Can it be eliminated?

Bias Hiring

While working in Diversity & Inclusive council, we came across the topic of unconscious bias at different level and as a Recruiter it definitely raised a brow! As how often do we do this? Are we aware of such bias? Have you identified it?

Bias is in favor or against thing, person or a group. It can have positive and negative impact on behavior.

Usually these types of Biases are stereotypes, which are usually culture, upbringing, surrounding, groups and even from the mentor or role model we believe in. There are many research which states that bias is made based on human assumptions and relying on particular interest an individual may have. It can occur in any means, involuntarily, unconsciously.

There are various Bias based on gender, Racial, Ethnicity, school/organization where we studied or worked, which could lead to disrupt in hiring a diverse team limiting it to similar talent pool.

Bias which are unconscious lead into fast decision making, judging and even lead to several other consequences. Unconscious bias which are also called as Implicit bias are mostly stereotyped, which could be avoided only by training and creating awareness

Unconscious Bias in Hiring

Recruiter undertaking the manual process of recruitment may at some point they hire employees by favoritism.

Recruitment plays an important role in workplace diversity hence it’s important that recruiters are trained for unconscious bias.

Recruitment are done by predetermined results. It makes it hard for genuine candidates with appropriate qualifications to lose such chances. Therefore, it brings out no important reason for calling for such organization because the organization is not aware of what is expected. Because the merits will not be considered in determining the performance of individuals.

But with the upholding artificial intelligence in the recruitment process, human biases to be eliminated. Definitely strategies should be used to reduce unconscious bias. Critical analysis states that bias could not be taught or trained in a single session, hence employees should be trained on a regular interval.

Recruiters have highlighted that they may take decision biased on gender, age or even names such as Sandra, Gregor and may thus avoid contacting candidates with name like Ahmed, Krishna (Madsen and Andrade, 2018).

These bias hiring are very wide and can’t be explained with smaller attributes. So, researchers say that these biases are due to personal negative experience which are in our mind and thus come out on general decision making. These types of bias can lead to adverse downfall of a diverse environment in the organization.

Unconscious bias is unintentional and many of us are not aware of it. These biases influence an individual behavior. It’s important that we identify these biases and train ourselves to adjust to the thinking, behavior which intends to bias.

As we are not aware of these biases it’s significant that we create awareness at work place and train employees, recruiters, leaders for biases.

Can Training eliminate unconscious bias?

Communication definitely is a key apart from awareness. I personally believe when we try to speak about difficult topics like biases could be gender, race, color etc. we train ourselves to not to incline towards such biases or stereotyping.

In corporate, many organizations like Google, Facebook are creating awareness and providing training to their employees. Studies have shown us that these unconscious biases could be trained in various interventions.

In today’s world where we are talking about diversity at workplace and it’s important that we try to manage or eliminate these biases for example gender bias.

Read about Inclusivity at workplace

Imagining a powerful woman at leadership position, it’s important we break the stereotype by training ourselves sharing and listening stories about some powerful women.

Do you think we can eliminate it by an effective training program? If yes what strategy you will use to eliminate it.

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